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Reinvigorating Academic Anesthesiology in 2014 – Opportunities for You

This article originally appeared in the Winter 2013 issue of AUA Update, the Association of University Anesthesiologists’ newsletter.

A new year is upon us, and this time often represents a period of reflection and resolution, of recuperation and reinvention. Considering all of the possible transformation, I’d like to add another word into the mix: reinvigorate. This is particularly important in the current rapidly changing healthcare environment.

Think to yourself: How can I reinvigorate my career this year? What can I do to infuse new energy into academic anesthesiology? How can I help someone generate more strength or gain more experience in the field?

The only way forward is to take action.

Thus, as we kick off 2014, I encourage you to take action, to find a way to support academic anesthesiology or participate in academic endeavors that will infuse the specialty with energy, strength and discovery.

Here are a few opportunities FAER is offering through which you can take action this year.

1. Apply for FAER Research Grant Funding (or Encourage a Colleague to do so) — Deadline is February 15

Last year, FAER awarded $2.4 million in research grant funding to 17 anesthesiologists – the second highest amount ever awarded in a single year. In 2014, we are aiming to invest even more. But the level of research funding we award depends on the number of quality proposals we receive, so submit an application or encourage a colleague to do so.

The application deadline for grants is February 15, 2014. Funding opportunities for 2014 include:

•    The Mentored Research Training Grant – Basic Science (MRTG-BS) is a two-year $175,000 grant that provides funding for research and training in basic science research to faculty members who are within 10 years of having completed their core anesthesiology residency. The MRTG-BS requires 75 percent research time.

•    The Mentored Research Training Grant – Clinical or Translational (MRTG-CT) is a two-year $175,000 grant that provides funding for research and training in clinical or translational research to faculty members who are within 10 years of having completed their core anesthesiology residency. The MRTG-CT requires 75 percent research time.

•    The Mentored Research Training Grant – Health Services Research (MRTG-HSR) is a two-year $175,000 grant that provides funding for research and training in health services research to faculty members who are within 10 years of having completed their core anesthesiology residency. The MRTG-HSR requires 75 percent research time.

•    The Research in Education Grant (REG) is a two-year $100,000 grant available to faculty members of all ranks. The REG is focused on developing innovative techniques for anesthesia education. The REG requires 40 percent research time.

•    The Research Fellowship Grant (RFG) is a one-year $75,000 grant available to anesthesiology trainees after CA-1 year. The RFG is awarded in conjunction with clinical training in an anesthesiology residency or fellowship program. The REG requires 80 percent research time.

To learn more about FAER research grants, visit FAER.org/research-grants.

2. Nominate a Colleague or Mentor for the 2014 Mentoring Excellence in Research Award

By recognizing the accomplishments and contributions of another, you ensure that the leadership and mentorship that breed success will continue into the future.

FAER’s Mentoring Excellence in Research Award recognizes an outstanding mentor in anesthesiology and the value of mentorship in the specialty. Each year, the FAER Academy of Research Mentors in Anesthesiology presents the award at the ASA annual meeting during the Celebration of Research.

If you know an anesthesiologist who is actively engaged in anesthesiology mentorship and has a sustained record of mentoring anesthesiologists over time, nominate him or her for the award. The award is based on the training experiences and successes of the nominee’s protégés, not solely on the mentor’s personal career achievements.

Anyone who is a protégé or a colleague of a successful anesthesiology mentor may submit a nomination. Nominators must have personal knowledge of the nominee’s mentoring efforts. Protégés should be actively involved currently in research, teaching, mentoring or other leadership activities.

The recipient of the 2013 FAER Mentoring Excellence in Research award was Harriet W. Hopf, M.D., Professor and Vice Chair of Anesthesiology, and Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at the University of Utah.

The deadline to submit nominations for the FAER Mentoring Excellence in Research Award is March 31, 2014. Please submit a nomination form, three letters of recommendation, the nominee’s curriculum vitae and a completed mentor table. Nomination forms and more information about the nomination process are available at FAER.org/mentor-award.

3. Become a FAER Visiting Professor

Nearly every anesthesiology department hosts visiting professorships each year. They do this because visiting professors provide excellent education and new insights and perspectives to faculty, especially junior faculty members and residents. One way to add even more value to a visiting professorship is to transform the standard visiting professor honorarium into a charitable contribution to FAER.

If you have a visiting professorship on your calendar for this year or next, consider enrolling as a FAER Visiting Professor, and, working with the host department, directing your honorarium to FAER. Or, if you are involved in planning your department’s visiting professorship, you might consider providing the option for your visiting professors to direct their honorariums to FAER. For more information, visit FAER.org/visiting-professor.

Thanks to the following anesthesiologists who have already enrolled in the FAER Visiting Professor Program by offering to donate all or part of their honorariums from visiting professorships to FAER.

Daniel Cole, M.D. (Mayo Clinic Arizona); Jesse Ehrenfeld, M.D., M.P.H. (Vanderbilt University); Martin H. Dauber, M.D. (University of Chicago); Paul Garcia, M.D., Ph.D. (Emory University); Simon Gelman, M.D., Ph.D. (Brigham and Women’s Hospital); Howard Gutstein, M.D. (MD Anderson Cancer Center); Warren S. Sandberg, M.D., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt University); Thomas F. Slaughter, M.H.A., C.P.H., M.D. (Wake Forest School of Medicine); Michael M. Todd, M.D. (University of Iowa); Arthur W. Wallace, M.D., Ph.D. (University of California San Francisco); Denham S Ward, M.D., Ph.D (University of Rochester).